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Saturday, November 10, 2012

United Nations elects genocidal Muslim leader of Sudan to head human rights commission

UN Watch, the Geneva-based non-governmental human rights group, urged UN chief Ban Ki-moon, rights commissioner Navi Pillay, U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice and the EU’s Catherine Ashton to condemn today’s U.N. election of genocidal, misogynistic and tyrannical Omar al-Badhir of Sudan to its 54-member Economic and Social Council, a top U.N. body that regulates human rights groups, oversees U.N. committees on women’s rights, and crafts resolutions from Internet freedom to female genital mutilation.

UN WATCH (h/t Linda R)  “This is an outrage,” said Hillel Neuer, executive director of UN Watch. “On the same day we hear that Sudan is killing babies and burning homes in Darfur — precisely the kind of dire situation ECOSOC should be urgently addressing — the U.N. has now made vital human rights protection less likely than ever.”
“It’s inexplicable that 176 of 193 U.N. member states voted to support the blood-soaked regime of Omar Al-Bashir, failing to recognize that electing genocidal Sudan to a global human rights body is like choosing Jack the Ripper to guard a women’s shelter,” said Neuer. “By granting the seal of international legitimacy to a mass murderer, the United Nations human rights system has today diminished its own credibility, and cast a shadow upon the reputation of the organization as a whole.” Although the U.S. took important action in September to pressure Sudan into withdrawing from this Monday’s elections to the 47-nation Human Rights Council — boosted by a massive campaign led my film star Mia Farrow and UN Watch — the Obama Administration has been surprsingly silent on today’s vote.

By contrast, in 2004, the U.S. ambassador famously walked out of ECOSOC after Sudan was elected. According to insiders, Washington’s silence on Sudan may stem from fear of upsetting African and Arab states in advance of America’s own fragile bid for a UNHRC seat in the Nov. 12 vote. 

The U.S. is said to have secured the least vote pledges out of the five Western countries vying for three allotted seats, behind Germany, Sweden, Ireland and Greece, all of which canvassed world support long before the U.S. threw its hat in the ring.
The Obama Administration promised that when a country is under Security Council sanction for massive human-rights abuses, “it should be barred, plain and simple, from leadership roles like chairmanships in U.N. bodies. Abusers of international law or norms should not be the public face of the U.N.”

Yet even though Sudan’s president al-Bashir was indicted by the International Criminal Court for genocide, war crimes and and crimes against humanity — by virtue of a Security Council referral — the U.S. voice has been silent, as has that of the European Union.

Al Bashir’s regime will now help select the members of the Commission on the Status of Women, the executive board of UN Women, and UNICEF, which protects children’s rights. Under the U.N. Charter, ECOSOC is the principal organ legislating on matters related to “promoting respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all.” Importantly, ECOSOC is also the body that accredits and oversees human rights groups at the U.N., deciding who can participate at the UN Human Rights Council.
The dominant influence of tyrannies in ECOSOC’s notorious 19-member “Committee on NGOs” has often led to the rejection or expulsion of human rights groups that dare to criticize China, Cuba or other repressive U.N. member states, or which speak for minority ethnic groups or for gay rights. 

My  Slave My Infidel

View investigative report on slavery in Sudan
View humanitarian aid in Sudan
My Slave, My Infidel is the story of the indigenous non-Arab Sudanese tribes in South Sudan and the western region of Darfur who are victimized by the Sudan government and their illegal militias who abduct slaves in the wake of the terror of Jihad.

Under the guise of civil war, the National Islamic Front government of Sudan declared Islamic Jihad against the infidels South Sudan that was further fueled by the discovery of oil in the borderlands. According to the Q’oran, an element of the Jihad calls for the enslavement of the Infidel. The film tells the story of the people who risked their lives in the midst of Jihad to rescue the slaves while the international community turned its back.

Goda Gadam Mohammed, a Sudanese Arab from the Reizegat Tribe of Darfur (the perpetrator tribe of the Janjiweed and the Murahaleen) followed the Jihad - until his compassion for the victims caused him to turn against the Jihad and his government. Goda’s compelling storytelling from the Arab perspective completes the film’s balance.

Opening in the late 1990’s during the North/South genocidal war, My Slave, My Infidel follows the slavery into the midst of the Darfur Genocide, luring the viewer into the exotic and mysterious world of Sudan, the Biblical Land of Cush

My  Slave My Infidel

  Ron Paul in 1998 John Birch Society Documentary on the UN Plot to take over America

Ron Paul in 1990 John Birch Society Documentary on the United Nations taking over the United States

Related Links by the John Birch Society about the United Nation here

U.N. Me Official Theatrical Trailer


The English language is insufficiently stocked with words to express adequately here the degree of evil involved in the fraud, deceit, and deliberate murder of hundreds of thousands of people that the movie U.N. Me exposes. It’s almost like lifting a rug and finding whole colonies of cockroaches nesting there.

Ami Horowitz, the producer and director of the movie U.N. Me, was motivated by the way Michael Moore interwove humor into his 2002 “documentary” Bowling for Columbine to do something similar with the United Nations. “Say what you will about Michael Moore, the guy knows how to make an entertaining and powerful film,” Horowitz told The Daily Caller.
Horowitz added:

We are dealing with very difficult issues ultimately — very heavy stuff — and to do it without levity, I thought, would be a recipe for disaster. Nobody wants to sit there for 90 minutes ... watching terrible images cross the screen, so I knew humor had to be a part of it.

In his film, Horowitz does an expert job presenting the "very heavy stuff" exposing the corruption of the widely revered UN institution — so expert in fact that his exposure swamps the levity. But it is the information and not the humor that's important, and Horowitz cannot be blamed for the fact that his information is shocking not humorous. What he has wrought is one of the most terrifyingly horrific presentations of the truth about the United Nations ever captured on celluloid.

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